This past weekend at the Park: Adoptapalooza, Violet & Bobby HawkWatch Fans Meet & World Science Festival Transforms

Adoptapalooza!

There was lots going on this past weekend at Washington Square. Good thing Phase II construction on the Eastern side finished in time!

First, Adoptapalooza on Saturday, June 4th featured over 100 cats and dogs for adoption. Fox News reports on the event here and Metromix New York has some great photos (including photo above). Metromix wrote:

Adoptapalooza is held regularly under the arch of Washington Square Park, celebrated with a day full of dog agility demonstrations, pet training, face-painting and photo ops.

This year over 100 adoptable dogs and cats were on hand to turn our hearts to mush and lick our faces clean off. There were mutts and pit bull mixes, papillons, beagles, puggles, chugs (chihuahua pugs, for the uninitiated), kittens and cats galore from shelters across the city. We wanted to take them all home with us! Trust us: one look at these faces and you will feel the same way!

Violet and Bobby (and Pip!) Hawk Cam followers via the New York Times met under the Arch on Sunday, June 5th at 10 a.m. The Times has the story here.

TreeHugger has a great piece on what went on at the park when the World Science Festival, a five day event (which sounds fantastic), came to the park on Sunday, its last day, utilizing the new “stage” and surrounding area.

Nice!

Photo: Gabi Porter

Jane Jacobs on Parks in our Cities

You can neither lie to a neighborhood park, nor reason with it. “Artist’s conceptions” and persuasive renderings can put pictures of life into proposed neighborhood parks or park malls, and verbal rationalizations can conjure up users who ought to appreciate them, but in real life only diverse surroundings have the practical power of inducing a natural, continuing flow of life and use. Superficial architectural variety may look like diversity, but only a genuine content of economic and social diversity, resulting in people with different schedules, has meaning to the park and the power to confer the boon of life upon it.

– “The uses of neighborhood parks” from The Death and Life of Great American Cities, 1961

More on Jane Jacobs as author, community activist, and urban planner from WSP Blog here.

More on Phase II tomorrow.